A Study Of An Old British Family

The Lomas Family fom England

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St. Laurence Church at Foleshill, England

Originally Foleshill was primarily a large area of heathland and waste with ill-defined boundaries and a number of scattered hamlets. The Domesday Book of 1086 names "Fulkeshill" and later "Folkshull". Its name, Folshill or Foleshill, signifies "the hill of the people or folk". According to the 1945 book "600 Years of Municipal Life", in 1899 the parishes of Stoke and Foleshill were added to Coventry, increasing the area to 4,147 acres and the population by another 8,000 people.


Today, Foleshill is a modern and thriving north-eastern suburb of Coventry.


At the time of the Norman conquest (1066) it was a small wooded hamlet, consisting of nine hides (a hid being 120 acres) with 30 villains and 6 bordars. The villains, bordars and serfs being the three classes of peasantry on a manor. Until the 18th century the chief occupation was agriculture. Sometime in the 19th century, coal was discovered and handloom weaving was then well established in the village.


The oldest building in the Foleshill area is the parish church of St. Laurence, known as "the old church". It was built in the 14th century and belonged to the monks of Coventry, the prior at this time being the Lord of the Manor of Foleshill. The first Lord of the Manor was Earl Leofric, and the last, Lord Boston. It is recorded that a church was built here in 11th century, possibly by the lady Godiva, Countess of Mercia. The Saxon font still in use is witness to this claim.


From the 14th to the 18th century the old church was the sole place of worship in the village, it was also the centre of its communal life. The Baptists were the pioneers of nonconformity in the district. They built their first chapel, Salem, at Longford in 1759. The Congregationalists followed at Little Heath in 1795 and the Methodists at Alderman's Green, Bell Green and Lockhurst Lane about 1820.


Other important events were the building of the Coventry canal in 1768 and the opening of the Coventry and Nuneaton railway in 1838. Both enterprises added considerably to the propriety of Foleshill.


From the 18th to the start of the 20th century ribbon weaving was the chief industry of the district and was carried out in the homes of the workpeople. There were only two factories in Foleshill prior to this time.


It is interesting to note that the Lockhurst Lane Co-operative Society was started in 1832 (twelve years before the Rochdale "pioneers") and is said to be the oldest surviving co-operative society in the country.


Foleshill has seen many, many changes since it was first mentioned as a Parish in 1086. Famous firms such as Herberts, Dunlop, Courtaulds, Riley, Jaguar, etc. were located here at one point in time and what was a rural parish sixty years ago has become a built-up area and the most industrialized part of Coventry.


The earliest settlements in the Foleshill area were probably at the hamlets of Hall Green and Little Heath; Saxon remains have been found on the site of St Laurence's Church, a 15th century building much restored in 1888.


Coventry Priory owned the church and some lands in the early Middle Ages, and Foleshill's prosperity has always been closely bound up with that of the city. It is safe to assume that the whole district was agricultural until Elizabethan times, but from then onwards, private speculators bought or leased land from the Corporation to prospect for coal, and mines were opened with varying degrees of success. There were no large estates, and when the French Huguenots brought their weaving skills to this country, the silk ribbon industry found a ready foothold in the Foleshill area at the beginning of the 18th century.


Village centres did not develop in the usual way because the building pattern was influenced by the two main roads (Stoney Stanton and Foleshill Roads) cutting across to Bulkington and Nuneaton; they were turnpiked in 1762 for the carrying of coal, and this trade received a further boost with the cutting of the Coventry Canal in 1769. Stonier and Richard Parrott of Hawkesbury were actively engaged in mining at this time, and the family provided for the continuation of the school built by Dr Edward Jackson in 1750.


A Baptist chapel was founded in Longford in 1765 and a strong Nonconfirmist element persisted throughout the 19th century. The churches and other charitable agencies did their best to alleviate the distress suffered by the weavers in 1826 and again in 1860, when men worked in the parish stoneyard for 6d a day and a loaf of bread, but conditions were very bad, particularly in the country districts. Foleshill acquired a reputation for lawlessness and immorality, and a wholesale migration took place: the population fell by 1,502 to 6,638 in the ten years to 1871, a decrease almost as large as that for the whole of Coventry at this period. (Tom Mann, the Labour leader, was born in Foleshill in 1856).


Some cottage factories were built in an attempt to stem the tide, but the workers who stayed turned to other trades; the machine tool and bicycle industries took the lead and by the 1890's Foleshill was on the threshold of a period of busy expansion. Coventry's boundary reached out towards the little communities now linked by intensive building, and factories such as Alfred Herbert, Courtaulds and many others were established. The Ordnance Works produced naval guns during the first World War, and by 1932 the city had extended still further, extinguishing the Foleshill Rural District created in 1836. Housing estates have sprung up since the last war in Bell Green, Court House Green and Nunts Park, so that the area is now entirely built up.


Prior to the reorganization of counties in 1974, Coventry resided in the previously named County of Warwickshire. Today it is now divided into West Midlands County and Warwicks County.


Foleshill is now a multi-racial ward to the north of Coventry City Centre. It is the home of many families whose families originated from the Indian Sub continent. It is also the home of many recent arrivals from parts of the world that have suffered conflict. As a result, Foleshill is considered a mixed area with houses, shops and industries side by side.


Foleshill includes the following neighborhoods:
John Gulson (also known as Eagle Street or Bishopsgate Green),
Pridmore (also known as Courtalds),
Edgwick,
Paradise,
Great Heath and Little Heath (also known as Upper Foleshill).


Most of the Little Heath area is in the Longford ward of the city. It consists of the following residential streets: Gayer Street, Thomas Lane Street, Partridge Croft, Quilletts Close, part of Proffitt Avenue and most of Old Church Road. It also contains a former Courtaulds factory, and Little Heath Industrial Estate. The Coventry Canal passes through the area. Little Heath is within walking distance of the Arena Park Tesco Superstore, and close to the Foleshill fire station. The Royal Hotel is situated on Old Church Road by the canal bridge and is the only public house in the area.


Most of the area's terraced properties were built around 1910 to 1930, and Little Heath is served by a primary school of the same name. Also in the area is Good Shepherd Roman Catholic (RC) Primary School, which shares its sports field with Little Heath Primary School. The Catholic parish church for Good Shepherd Primary School is St. Elizabeth's RC Church in Edgwick. The Church of England (C of E) church for Little Heath is St Laurence's, which has a church hall also used for groups such as the Brownies and Girl Guides. At the top end of Old Church Road there is another school - Foleshill C of E Primary School, which is not actually in Foleshill.


Several members of the early Lomas Family in Foleshill were ribbon weavers by trade.


Ribbon Weaving
In 1801 the population of Foleshill was 3,026. There were just over 600 inhabited houses, four times the number found in 1730. There were 937 industrial workers, all thought to be weavers, and only 65 agricultural workers in the parish. (fn. 79) By 1818 there were in the parish 2,544 weavers and their assistants, using 1,732 looms; this can be compared with 4,973 weavers in Coventry itself, and 194 in Sowe, the next biggest parish in the county of the city. The population continued to grow rapidly.


In 1831 there were 6,969 people and a total of 1,575 houses; of the latter 429 had been built since 1821 and building was still in progress. That there were by then only 30 coal miners in the parish demonstrates the comparative decline of the once dominant industry. But the ribbon weaving itself had then passed its peak. The great increase in 1831 was not of weavers, whose numbers had remained constant, but of people who were in fact suburban residents of Coventry. The ribbon trade was subject to unpredictable changes of fashion, and had to face competition from abroad and from other districts of England. Moreover, there was competition within the district, between Coventry, where engine looms (still handpowered) were accepted by the early 1830s, and the rural parishes, where the single-hand weavers stubbornly refused to adopt engine-looms, and where many of the weavers were underpaid women and children.


Foleshill was not as industrially backward as some of the other parishes, and some features of the industry there were comparable to those of the city. In the 19th century a succession of masters' associations, and of weavers' unions, were formed to represent the industry in Parliament, to protect the interests of the rural districts, and to fix prices and wages. In 1840 the country weavers wanted a local board of trade set up, of seven weavers and seven masters, to regulate prices and conditions of work. There was, however, a long period of poverty and bitterness. Already in 1788 the poor of the Coventry district had been advised to sow early-ripening beans with their potatoes 'which often will obviate the necessity they are under of tearing the unripe roots from the earth to satisfy the cravings of hunger'. In 1801, J. Howlett, the Vicar of Foleshill, could describe the 'spirit of discontent and disaffection [which] has arisen alarmingly high: imputable, in a great measure to the late scarcity (which has been attended with grievous and unparalleled distress) and has been repressed more by fear than any better motive'.


By comparison: In 1821 there were 5,000 ribbon weavers in Coventry out of a population of 21,000. By 1841 there were 30,000 weavers in Coventry working on 3,500 plain and 2,228 Jacquard looms. This influx of weavers caused major housing problems because of the wall that surrounded the city and because the weavers, who were freemen, had no rights over the ring of common land surrounding the city walls.


The area of Hillfields was created as a settlement outside of the city walls. This occurred in 1828 and Hillfields became the area for the most skilled craftsmen that Coventry had. Many factories were set up to manufacture ribbon on a more commercial basis but there were dissenting voices amongst the craftsmen. To demonstrate their opposition, the weavers burnt to the ground the first commercial ribbon factory.


In the late 1850's peace was achieved and predominant amongst the peacemakers were the Cash brothers. Cash's Labels continues to this day carrying out the same sort of ribbon and label making that it always has.


One of the world's best-known names in silk weaving, Coventry company Cash's (UK) began life in Foleshill. Quaker brothers John and Joseph Cash started work on a factory at Kingfield in 1857 which the company was to occupy for the next 138 years.


Cash's Topshops beside Coventry Canal in Foleshill's Kingfield.

Above rows of weavers' cottages, the brothers created an upper storey with well-lit work areas housing jacquard looms powered by a central beam engine. These were the famous Cash's Topshops which can still be seen beside the Coventry canal today. Many of the original topshops and cottages are now in use as flats. By 1860 the industry had collapsed because of cheap imports. Many weavers immigrated to the colonies. However, J.J Cash still exists in Coventry to this day.


COVENTRY Timeline
The name Coventry, by common consent, derives from 'Cofa's Tree'. Other villages and towns with 'tree' names usually refer to an ancient boundary marker and suggest a movement outwards from the original settlement to a point on the border of the original territory. Before the end of the first millennium little seems to have taken place that gave cause for Cofantreo / Cofa's Tree / Coventry to stand out at all. There seems to be no Roman settlement in Coventry itself though of course there was at the Lunt Fort at Baginton not more than 3 miles outside the city centre. No doubt ancient Britons had taken up residence on high ground, perhaps in a clearing in the ancient Forest of Arden, long since gone.


  • 1016- A nunnery dedicated to St. Osburg was sacked by the Danes
  • 1043- The first sign of Godiva. Her husband, Leofric, Earl of Mercia, founded a Benedictine Monastery on the site of the sacked St. Osburg's Nunnery.
  • 1057- Leofric died
  • 1067- Death of Lady Godiva
  • 1086- Domesday Book records only 69 heads of families in Coventry. (So, not that many people got to see the naked Lady.)
  • 1090- Coventry castle built.
  • 1136- Coventry castle razed by King Stephen
  • 1334- Coventry is seen as the fifth largest town in England.
  • 1337- Cheylesmore Manor is taken on by the Black Prince
  • 1342- Whitefriars Friary is endowed by Sir John Poultney
  • 1348- John Ward is elected the first Mayor of Coventry
  • 1350- St John's Church is completed
  • 1355- Wall is started
  • 1393- The tower of St. Michael's is completed
  • 1422- Coventry Cross is erected in Cross Cheaping
  • 1429- Bells are hung in St Michaels
  • 1451- Henry VI presents the town with County Status
  • 1471- Edward IV removes the County status from Coventry
  • 1483- Richard III visits
  • 1485- Henry VII visits on his way back from Bosworth Field.
  • 1506- Fords hospital is founded
  • 1510- Henry VIII visits with his wife Catherine of Aragon
  • 1533- Town wall and gates completed
  • 1555- Last burnings of martyrs
  • 1565- Queen Elisabeth I visits Coventry and lodges with John Hales at the converted Whitefriars Priory
  • 1569- Mary, Queen of Scots, is imprisoned in the City.
  • 1572- John Hales founds the Free Grammar School in Hales St
  • 1603- Bubonic plague (The Black Death) visits the city and claims the life of 494 citizens
  • 1611- Henry, Prince of Wales, visits
  • 1616- James I visits and stays at Hales Place.
  • 1642- Charles I attempts to break into the city but is rebuffed
  • 1647- Royalist prisoners are kept in St John's Church and "sent to Coventry"
  • 1662- The town wall is demolished by order of Charles II
  • 1665- A hurricane strikes the City and blows down the spire of Holy Trinity
  • 1687- James II visits
  • 1700- Ribbon Weaving and watch making are introduced to the City
  • 1762- New Gate is demolished
  • 1764- Bishop St Gate is demolished
  • 1765- Gosford gate is demolished
  • 1770- Spon Gate is demolished
  • 1802- Lord Nelson arrives in the City
  • 1808- Louis XVIII pass through the City
  • 1821- The first public gasworks is built
  • 1829- The building of a church onto the existing Christ Church Steeple is begun
  • 1838- London to Birmingham Railway is opened passing though Coventry
  • 1848- Ellen Terry, the famous actress, is born in Coventry
  • 1849- Last Public hanging takes place. Mary Bell was the ladies name
  • 1858- Queen Victoria visits the City
  • 1860- Ribbon weaving slumps and many people emigrate to the colonies
  • 1881- James Starley - he of Penny Farthing cycle fame - dies.
  • 1896- The first cars manufactured in England are made at the Humber works by Lawson's Daimler company
  • 1904- Coutaulds opens a factory
  • 1915- King George V visits the city's munitions factories.
  • 1920- Council house is officially opened
  • 1939- Outbreak of war with Germany.

 

Family Origin of the Foleshill Lomases
In particular, the original Foleshill Lomases were of smaller stature with darker hair and skin complexion. Some of them believed their ancestors were the "Black Irish" who became known in Ireland shortly after the Spanish Armada invasion. An Essay On the Black Irish Myth


Reference the writings of Dr. Elias Loomis (1875) and revisions by Dr. Elisha Loomis (1908):
"In the hope of obtaining some further information as to the early history of the Lomas family, I have consulted the most extensive biographical dictionaries within my reach for the names Lomas and Lomax; also all the directories of cities and countries of Europe which I could find in the United States, or in those parts of Europe which I have visited; and I have also consulted all the large gazeteers that I could find in quest of places bearing either of the above names, or any name having a decided resemblance to either of them.


The following is a brief summary of the results obtained respecting the names of persons -
1. Cantoral (Hieron de) Lomas, a Spanish poet from Valladolid, lived in the latter half of the sixteenth century, and wrote various poems, which were published at Madrid in 1577. See Grosses Vollstandiges Universal Lexicon, 1738, v. 18, p. 330. Also Ticknor's History of Spanish Literature, v. 3, p 513.

2. Giovanni Paul Lomazzo, an Italian painter and savant, born at Milan,(*) April 26, 1538, of a distinguished family from the village of Lomazzo, near Como. He was called to Florence by Cosmo de Medicis, who made him guardian of a gallery of 4,000 paintings. He died in 1598.-Biographie Universelle, Paris, 1819, t. 24, p. 637.

3. In the Directory of Spain (El Indicador de Espana, Barcelona, 1864, 1865) appears the name of Nicolas Lomas at Santander. The name Loma occurs five times in the Provinces of Madrid, Toledo, Cordova and Burgos.

In 1864, Fidel Carcia Lomas was sub-director del Registro de la propiedad. --El Indicador, p. 23.

In 1869, Eduardo de la Lomas was civil Governor of the Province of Saragossa.

In 1874, General Loma commanded a division of the Spanish army operating against the Carlists.

4. In the Directory of Milan (Guida di Milano per l'anno, 1867) appear the names of Antoinetta Lomazzi and Ippolito Lomazzi.

5. In the Directory of France (Almanach des 500,000 adresses, 1867, de Paris et des Departments) no name is found resembling Lomas. The same is true of the Directories of Brussels, Amsterdam and Copenhagen. In the Directories from 1535 to 1713 the duchy of Milan was a dependency of the Spanish crown. of Berlin, Dresden and Leipsic, the name Lommatsch frequently occurs. Also the Directory of Berlin for 1866 contains the name Lomax, but upon inquiry this was found to be an Englishman recently established in Germany."


The following is a summary of the places bearing the name Lomas, or a name somewhat resembling it -
Lomas, a village in the Province of Palencia, Spain, with a population of 519.--Bescherelle Dictionaire de Geographie Universelle.


Lomis, a village of Switzerland, 15 miles S. W. of Constance.(*)


Lomiswyl (i. e., Lomis-ville), a village of Switzerland, four miles west of Soleure.


Lomazzo, a village of Lombardy, near Como. Population 2,292.


When we toured Italy in 2011, we somehow lost our way on the map around Como. As a result, we discovered Lomazzo strictly by accident as it is so small it is not on the map!
Joe Lomas, the Webmaster, was at the village of Lomazzo, Italy in 2011

Lommatsch, a town in Saxony, 22 miles from Dresden. Population 2,275.


Lomas, a town in the Argentine Republic, South America. Lat. 31 deg. 30 min. S. Long. 62 deg. 18 min. W.


Lomas Bay, Straits of Magalhaens, S. A. Lat. 52 deg. 30 min. S. Long. 69 deg. 10 min. W.


Point Lomas, in Peru, S. A. Lat. 17 deg. 32 min. S. Long. 74 deg. 54 min. W.


Point Loma, San Diego, California. Lat. 32 deg. 42 min. N. Long. 117 deg. 15 min. W.


Loma Hill, a mountain in Western Africa. Lat. 9 deg. 25 min. N. Long. 9 deg. 51 min. W.


Does the preceding information afford a basis for any conjecture respecting the early history of the Lomas family?


It is generally contended by writers on onomatology that all proper names had originally a peculiar and appropriate meaning. (See Salverte's Essai historique sur les noms d'homme, t. 1, p. 7.) Is the name Lomas derived from any word or combination of words in the English language? No one has ever suggested any such derivation which could be considered as in any degree plausible. The conclusion seems to follow of necessity that the name Lomas is NOT of English origin. The same considerations lead to the conclusion that it is not of French, or German, or Italian origin.


The case is, however, different with Spain. Loma in Spanish signifies a little hill, and lomas is the plural of loma, signifying hills. It is probable, therefore, that the names Loma and Lomas were early introduced as surnames in Spain, and we can understand why these names were applied to places which were inhabited by Spaniards, or of which the Spaniards were the first explorers. The conclusion naturally follows that the Lomas family in England came from Spain about the year 1400, or perhaps earlier.


The names Lomis and Lomisville, applied to villages in Switzerland, render it probable that persons of the same name came from Spain, or perhaps from the Lomas family established in England, later migrated to Switzerland.


The names Lomazzi and Lomazzo in Northern Italy are also thought to have originated from the same stock. These names differ from Lomax or Lomatz only in substituting an Italian termination.


This will appear from the following examples:
The English name Lawrence becomes Lorenzo in Italian.
" Morris " Maurizio "
" Boniface " Bonifazio "
" Florence " Fiorenze "
" Nice " Nizza "
" Venice " Venezia "


N.B.- Refer to Prof. C. A. Hoppin, Jr.


It is possible that the name Lommatsch in Saxony is simply the name Lomatz modified by a change of termination, so as better to express the peculiar German pronunciation.


It seems, therefore, probable that the Lomas family originated in Spain; that four or five centuries ago, and perhaps earlier, one or more members of this family became established in England, while others of the family found their way into Northern Italy.


It may appear strange that when the facilities for travel were so restricted, as they were in Europe during the middle ages, the Lomas family should have become so widely scattered. But we know that during the Crusades (from A. D. 1096 to 1270), adventurers from England, France, Spain, Germany and Italy, were united in a common cause; and those crusaders who returned from Palestine instead of returning to their native homes, were frequently dispersed into foreign countries. The result must have been a considerable mingling together of the people of the different nations of Europe.


It may be objected to the fact that Laurent Lomax had a coat of arms proves that he was not of foreign origin. Such an objection is not well founded as many English families that have a coat of arms are of French origin, while others are of German, Italian, or Spanish origin. Among families of this description having a German origin occur the names Deycheler, Kramer, Lauginger, Mazzinghi, and Weber; among those families having an Italian origin occur the names Castillon, Corsellis, De Moline, and Sileto; while among the families admitted to be of Spanish origin occur the names Ayala, Florio, Gambow, and Ilbery."
(Quotes of the writings are courtesy of the Loomis Families of America)


Conclusions:
Many questions as to the origin of the Lomas family from Foleshill exist to this day. Who and where did we come from?


(1) With respect to the "LOOMIS" family, the descendants of the Lomas family from Little Heath doubt the fact they are related. However, many believe there is a connection.


Lance D. Loomis, Director of the Loomis Families of America concurs with us. Lance believes in the accuracy of the research of Elias Loomis and Charles Hoppin as he has connected the Lomas family to the Loomis family on his website. Lance has worked hard to resolve many family questions. To conclusively settle the issue of family connections, Lance has provided the Loomis Family DNA Project and invites us to go to his web site and apply for a DNA test. The Loomis Family has begun to test direct male Loomis descendants to establish a possible means of determining the different lines of the Loomis family, as well as expand data to the family lines such as Lomas to determine if there is a link or not.


(2) It has been confirmed that some members of the Lomas family actually changed the spelling of the name to "LOMAX". Although nobody is certain of the reason for this occurrence; it probably boils down to regional pronunciation. However, I have not established a definitive connection between the Lomas/x Family in Foleshill, Warwicks and the County of Greater Manchester (Lancashire) or any other county in England. This fact lends credibility to the lingering family belief that ancestors immigrated from Ireland. The family belief makes perfect sense as Foleshill was always popular with Irish immigrants looking for work. Did we immigrate from Ireland?


(3) Are the theories of Elias Loomis and Charles Hoppin fact? Beyond Ireland, could there have been a Spanish Connection? Could a shipwrecked Spaniard have landed off the coast of Ireland?


Regardless of the dates and locations of possible migrations, one undeniable fact exists today... the LOMAS surname, in the exact spelling, is prevalent in the telephone listings of Southern Europe, through Spain, the French Riviera and into Italy! The extensive Spanish White Pages ("Paginas Blancas") telephone listings indicate the Lomas surname has been predominant all over Spain for several generations right up to the present day. This confirms the writings of Dr. Elisha Scott Loomis.


 

1840's Life in Foleshill, Warwickshire

Transcription by Brian Blackford:
Brian says: (this) wonderful document about life in Foleshill in the 1840's should be of interest to any social historian, but certainly to anyone with interest in Foleshill ancestors... and you thought that things were bad nowadays!


The document comes from the 1841 Handloom Weavers Commission Report. The Robert Cantrill quoted in the article was Brian's 3x great-grandfather.


Handloom Weaver's Commission Report 1841, page 76.
The following evidence was given me in public, at Foleshill, by Richard Holmes, an intelligent undertaker, and one of the constables:- 'The mass of the people, with the exception of a few young men, are brutally ignorant, and the intelligence which is to be found in the exceptions has manifested itself only within the last half-dozen years.


It is not the population which has gone down into ignorance: it has never emerged from it. This is not surprising, for there is not an efficient school in the parish (which contains upwards of 7000 inhabitants). The people are as ignorant as ever, and, in proportion to their numbers, more immoral. There is more profanity, more Sabbath breaking and more immorality than formerly. Their language is awfully depraved.


Independently of their irreligion, they are practically more immoral than formerly. Bastardy is greater than ever, even since the Poor-Law Ammendment Act (and information to the same effect was given me in regard to the City). At any little holiday time, the public houses will be thronged with girls ready for the lowest excesses. Both sexes are great drinkers, chiefly of ale. The place is also notorious for poaching, and robberies, and the Magistrates of Coventry well know that when a desperate case is brought before them it is generally from this neighbourhood.


Compared to what they now are, though rude and ignorant, they were formerly a harmless population. The foregoing observations apply to the mass; the latter are only exceptions. Robert Cantrill, an aged man, of the same class, thinks that, "though the journeyhand weavers' houses, forty years ago, were poor miserable places, which might be called 'hovels' almost, the journeyhands are less well conducted now.


There have been several highway robberies, with violence, during the twelve months last past; housebreaking is very frequent: pantries are robbed; and other depredations are committed. There are garden robberies in abundance, but the guilty parties are not generally found out.' Thinks there is more drinking now than there was then. One great cause of the decline was the war, which took the young men out great fools, and brought them home big rogues, to contaminate the rest. A part, certainly, of the general misconduct is brought on by distress. Thinks it makes a man hopeless, and, when hopeless, he becomes desperate, and preys upon society, and careless even of what little honest advantages are in his way; and then comes the last wretchedness.


Times of bad trade, in the witness's youth, which were very frequent, then, as now, always led to thieving. Thinks, however, that there was then nothing of the aggravated kind that there now is. 'Now never a night passes without some depredation in this or the neighbouring parishes.' 'One of the most notorious class of depredations is robbing the barges on the canal which passes through the weaving parishes and is part of the Grand Junction line. They are robbed of every kind of goods, which here find plenty of receivers; the abstraction being made either by the bargemen themselves or with their connivance. A principle article is silk, on its passage from London to the North, for the disposal of which, when stolen, it is asserted that there is a very complete organisation. The thieves have their throwsters, their dyers, manufacturers of the class of undertakers, of whom there are many in Foleshill, their warehouse and their travelling agent to sell the goods.


"There are not fewer than twenty benefit clubs in the parish, for mutual assistance in case of affliction, but they are not enrolled. The members subscribe 6d. per week each, meet fortnightly at a public house, each to spend not less than 3d. and divide their stock equally at the end of the year, each member leaving a small sub-scription towards the next year's stock."


Mr. John Slingsby, one of the most respectable undertakers in the trade, and his son-in-law, Joseph Cuthbert, the parish clerk and constable, thus describes the habits of the people at Bulkington:-
"The working in the night injures the sight, injures the health, and injures the habits. It increases crime. A parcel of fellows meeting in the night, without any control, but at liberty to do as they please, encourage each other in small disorders and pilferings, gradually extending to large offenses. This liberty in the middle of the night first leads them to 'sprees' and 'larks', in robbing gardens and orchards and in poaching.


List of Baptisms taken from the Parish Records of St. Laurence Church in Foleshill from 1733 to 1753 and 1780-1851, and 1890 - 1913:
  • 1797 Lomas Zilla
  • 1802 Lomas Edward
  • 1824 Lomas Hannah
  • 1827 Lomas William
  • 1828 Lomas Harriet
  • 1891 Lomas Gilbert Maude
  • 1892 Lomas George
  • 1894 Lomas Freddy
  • 1897 Lomas Harriet
  • 1900 Lomas Sidney
  • 1782 Lomax Thomas
  • 1792 Lomax Ede
  • 1793 Lomax Jan
  • 1795 Lomax William
  • 1796 Lomax William
  • 1799 Lomax Job Wilson
  • 1805 Lomax Hannah
  • 1820 Lomax Jane
  • 1827 Lomax William

List of Marriages taken from the Parish Records of St. Laurence Church in Foleshill from 1770 to 1844 and 1845 (many missing), 1846-1877, 1892-1911:
  • 1829 - Edward Lomas, Mary Goode
  • 1875 - James Lomas, Roseina Hall
  • 1857 - James Rilley, Anne Lomas
  • 1859 - John Boneham, Betsy Lomas
  • 1826 - John Whetstone, Hannah Lomas
  • 1841 - William Cox, Hannah Lomas
  • 1899 - William Arthur Davis, Hannah Elizabeth Lomas
  • 1847 - William Rice, Harriett Lomas
  • 1903 - Percy Colledge, Mary Ann Lomas
  • 1854 - George Lomas, Elizabeth Williams

 

Some Foleshill National Archives Record Entries:

Miscellaneous documents relating principally to the Coventry Area

Enclosure Award
Reference: PA/101/127
Scope and Content
4th. Mar., 1763. Enclosure Award made under an Act of the first year of George III whereby, having recited:
firstly, that the Act rehearses that several fields at Exhall pa., Coventry were called "Church Field", "Stone Pit Field", "Longdon Field" and "Great Sydnal Field" (in area eleven yardlands) together with enclosures called "Lammas Wastes", "the Scarlings", "Middle Waste", "Far Waste", "Great Down Hiron", "Little Down Hiron", "the Pingle", "Heck Leys", "Spring Wastes", "Gosty Wastes", "the Hayes's", "Brick-kiln Waste", "Down Meadow", "Longdon Meadow" and part of Tackley Waste;

secondly, that it was enacted that John Newcomb (of Brinklow, Warws.), Lewis Bradley (of Wootton Wawen, Warws.) and William Wyatt (of Seaney Park, Staffs.), gents., be appointed commissioners to investigate before 29th. Sept., 1761 and that when they should have made their partition they would award the allotments with 21/7/- in lieu of tithes and have their findings enrolled within six months;

thirdly, that meetings have been held in accordance with the Act appointing the intended rent-charge in lieu of tithe, and that the survey was made by John Corbett (of Binley, Warws.);

fourthly, that Sir Samuel Garrard, Bt. Has died since the Act was passed so his interest has descended to Sir Benet Garrard, Bt.;

fifthly, that Elizabeth Wilson's interest has similarly passed to William Wilson;

and sixthly, that the interest of Ann Pickard, widow has fallen to Ann and Mary Farmer, spinsters: therefore, primarily, Church, and Stone Pit, Fields' lands are divided between Revd. Pickard Cleeve (vicar of Exhall), pre-Act owners and Richard [II] Cheslyn (the lay impropriator) - hence

(a) to R. Cleeve pass the vicaral tithes and glebe (1a.)in Church Field (covering 22a.; bounded by Vicar's Close on part of the west, on part of the north and the rest of the west by Gibbons Close and Gibbons Meadow (occupied by Thomas Stafford) over the brook to Gibbons Stile, elsewhere on the north by an allotment made to Elizabeth Grosvenor and the first allotment hereafter made to R. [II] Cheslyn ("Uppermost Birdingbush"), on the north and east by Birdingbush Furlong, eastward by R. [II] Cheslyn's two Church Field allotments which belong to Exhall churchyard, on part of on the south by the churchyard and Church Houses' gardens, on the south-west and south by a private way (from the churchyard to Vicarage Lane at the Vicarage House), and on the remaining parts of the north, east and south by the vicarage garden) - the fences on the southern side of the allotment at the vicarage house and the east-gate near the churchyard's north-western end will be made by the several owners (except the vicar) with 4-ft. Ditches, three rails and quickset hedges;

(b) to R. [II] Cheslyn goes 34a.0r.3p. In Church Field (bounded on the west by Elizabeth Grosvenor's allotment; on part of the north by Edward Freeman's Church Field allotment, on part of the east and part of the north by "Catch Croft" which belongs to Sir B. Garrard; on the rest of the north by Sir. B. Garrard's allotment; on the rest of the east by Bowling Green Lane; on part of the south by the secondly-described land allotted to R. [II] Cheslyn in Church Field and Stone Pit Field; and on the rest of the south by R. Cleeve's allotment), which award (plus 34/15/9 (received by R. [II] Cheslyn from William Smart for purchase of land (worth 1/5/9 p.a.) which covers one-eighth of Hayeses Wastes), and 52/6/3 (received by R. [II] Cheslyn from Thomas Foster for buying land (worth 1/18/9 p.a.) which is one-eighth of Gosty Wastes) forms R. [II] Cheslyn's impropriation-compensation for profits from those two common fields and the Brick-kiln, Middle Hayes, Spring, Heckleys, Gosty and Shoulder-of-Mutton Wastes, and Lammas Waste;

(c) to R. [II] Cheslyn goes also (proprietor of 1 yardland, and of another yardland bought from William Grove, Esq., and of 3r.25p. Bought from Thomas Oldham, gent.) 32a.0r.16p. In Church and Stone Pit Fields (bounded on part of the west by William White, Esq.'S Church Field allotment; on part of the north by Exhall parish officers' allotment; on part of the east by churchyard; on parts of the east, north and west by the allotment given to Mary Barrs (widow); on parts of the west and south by the churchyard; on part of the west by R. Cleeves's allotment UT supra; on part of the north by R. [II] Cheslyn's already-described allotment; on parts of the east, north and east [sic] by Exhall Hall Yard, Hall Meadow and Hall Close; on parts of the east, south and east by Cow Close; on part of the south by the allotment made to William Wilson, gent. in Stone Pit Field; on parts of the south, south-west and south by Matthew Neale's Stone Pit Field allotment; on the rest of the south and part of the west by Stone Pit Field land intended for Revd. Samuel [II] Brookes and Alice Hands; and on the rest of the west by W. White's allotment);

(d) to Sir Benet Garrard (proprietor of one-and-one-eighth yardlands) passes 21a.2r.35p. in Church Field (bounded on the west by Catch Croft belonging to him; on part of the north by Catch Croft Lane; on part of the north by Bedworth Waste; on the rest of the north by Thomas Jackson's orchard; on the east by Bowling Green Lane; and on the south by R. [II] Cheslyn's first allotment);

(e) to Edward Freeman (proprietor of yardland) goes 3a.2r.21p. in Church Field (bounded on the west by Elizabeth Grosvenor's allotment; on the north by Catch Croft Lane; on the east by Catch Croft; and on the south by R. [II] Cheslyn's firstly-described allotment);

(f) to Elizabeth Grosvenor (proprietress of yardland) is allotted 16a.1r.0p. in Church Field (bounded on parts of the north and west by the allotment belonging to Mary Lynes, widow; on parts of the north and west by Grosvenors Pingle; on the rest of the north by Catch Croft Lane; on part of the east by E. Freeman's allotment; on the rest of the east by R. [II] Cheslyn's firstly-described allotment; on part of the south by R. Cleeve's allotment; and on the rest of the west and souby by Gibbons Closes);

(g) for Mary Lynes (proprietress of one-eighth of a yardland) is intended 4a.0r.33p. in Church Field (bounded on parts of the west and north by Whites Pingle and Murcotts Pingle; on the rest of the north by a lane called Sweet Liver Green; on part of the east by E. Grosvenor's Pingle; on parts of the east and south by E. Grosvenor's allotment; and on the rest of the south by Gibbons Closes);

(h) Mary Barrs, widow (proprietress of two lands without commons in Church Field and of two similar ones bought from Joseph Bentley since the Act was passed) will have 1r.32p. in Church Field (bounded east, south and west by R. [II] Cheslyn's secondly-described allotment; and north by the churchyard);

(i) to Exhall churchwardens and overseers passes 3a.0r.1p. in Church Field (bounded on the west by William White, esq.'s Church Field allotment; on the north and north-west by R. Cleeve's allotment; and on the south-east and south by R. [II] Cheslyn's secondly-described allotment: the officers will maintain the fences from the churchyard to Dead Lane);

(j) to William White (proprietor of yardland) goes 4a.0r.19p. in Church Field (bounded on part of the south by Samuel [II] Brookes' and Alice Hands' allotment; on parts of the south and west by Lower Holt (occupied by W. White); on the north by R. Cleeve's allotment; on part of the east by the parish officers' allotment; and on the rest of the east by R. [II] Cheslyn's secondly-described allotment);

(k) to Revd. Samuel [II] Brookes and Alice Hands (proprietors of yardland) is allotted 10a.2r.22p. in Stone Pit Field (bounded on part of the north by W. White's allotment; on the rest of the north and on the east by R. [II] Cheslyn's secondly-described allotment; on the south by Matthew Neale's Stone Pit Field allotment; and on the west by Little Holt and Upper Holt: M. Neale will make a gate into Dead Lane where his land marches with this portion, so S. [II] Brookes and A. Hands will not fence the perch reserved for that purpose);

(1) for Matthew Neale (proprietor of yardland) is intended 16a.3r.4p. in Stone Pit Field (bounded on part of the west by Murcotts Close (held by Joseph Bentley); on the rest of the west and part of the north by S. [II] Brookes' and A. Hands' allotment; on the rest of the north, the north-east and part of the east by R. [II] Cheslyn's second-described allotment and on the south by Joseph Bentley's Stone Pit Field allotment);

(m) to Joseph Bentley (proprietor of three-sixteenths of a yardland) passes 9a.1r.13p. in Stone Pit Field (bounded west by Murcotts Close; north by M. Neale's allotment; east by an allotment assigned to Ann and Mary Farmer (spinsters), Esther Hales, William White (esq.) and Phillips Farmer (gent.); on part of the south by Edward Catterns' allotment; and on the rest of the south by Cookes Close);

(n) to Edward Catterns (proprietor of yardland) goes 13a.1r.12p. in Stone Pit Field (bounded on the east by Revd. Charles Hutchinson's and Christopher Gunman, esq.'s allotment; on parts of the south-west, south and west by Mill Meadows (occupied by E. Catterns) and the brook; on the north-west, and parts of the south and west, by the brook and an enclosure (held by John Webster, esq. and -- Murcott, gent.); on part of the west by Catternses Lane; on part of the north and the rest of the south-west by Websters and Murcotts Pingle; on the rest of the west by Cookes Close; on part of the north by J. Bentley's allotment; on part of the east by W. Wilson's Stone Pit Field allotment; on part of the east, the north-east and the rest of the north by Ann Farmer et al's allotment; on the rest of the east by A. Farmer et al's home close; and on the rest of the south by C. Hutchinson's and C. Gunman's allotment: E. Catterns will fence the last-named boundary as far as C. Hutchinson's and C. Gunman's gate);

(o) to Revd. Charles Hutchinson and Christopher Gunman (proprietors of yardland) is allotted 7a.1r.10p. in Stone Pit Field (bounded on the west on the brook, and by Mill Meadow (occupied by E. Catterns); on the north by E. Catterns' allotment; on part of the east by Pickards Home Close; on the rest of the east by Woodshires Close; and on the south by the allottees' home close, they maintaining the fence up to Woodshires Green Gate);

(p) to Ann Farmer and Mary Farmer (spinsters), Esther Hales, William White (esq.) and Phillips Farmer (gent.) (proprietors of 1 yardlands) goes 20a.0r.1p. in Stone Pit Field (bounded on the west, the south-west and part of the south by E. Catterns' allotment; on the north by W. Wilson's Stone Pit Field allotment; on parts of the east and south by Pickards Close; on part of the south and the rest of the east by "the Rickyard"; and on the rest of the south by A. Farmer et al's yard and home close); and

(q) to William Wilson (proprietor of 1 yardlands, and of one-eighth of a yardland bought from John Knightley since the Act's passage) passes 24a.3r.0p. (bounded on the west by E. Catterns', J. Bentley's and M. Neale's allotments; on part of the north by R. [II] Cheslyn's secondly-described allotment; on the rest of the north and on the east by Cow Close and Hemp Yard (occupied by W. Wilson); and on the south by A. Farmer et al's allotments):

secondarily, the common closes in Church and Stone Pit Fields are awarded as follows -

(a) to R. [II] Cheslyn go four parts of Heckley Wastes in Stone Pit Field (called "the Heckleys near Exhall Hall Green", "Great Heckleys", "Middle Heckleys" and "the Heckleys by Idle Lane"), which cover 22a.3r.11p. and communicate with both fields (bounded on the south and part of the west by Exhall Hall Green; on the rest of the west by Hayles Lane; on the north by Idle Lane; and on the east by the Coventry-Nuneaton Turnpike), in right of his common lands but also for rights formerly belonging to William Grove for 3r.25p. once enjoyed by Samuel Oldham;

(b) to Ann Farmer et al goes an allotment in Brick-kiln Wastes and "Wards or Middle Waste" (communicating with Church Field) covering 10a.1r.19p. (bounded on the west by the road from [Exhall] Moathouse to Woodshires Green; north-east by Moors Close (occupied by R. [II] Cheslyn); east by Green Lane; south-east by part of Wards Waste in Foleshill pa.; and on the south-west by Woodshires Green) and another allotment in Spring Wastes (communicating with Stone Pit Field) covering 10a.1r.19p. also (bounded on part of the west by Moors Home Close (occupied by R. [II] Cheslyn); on the rest of the west by Pickards Close; on the north by Exhall Hall Green; on the east by the Coventry-Nuneaton turnpike; and on the south-east by Spring Lane);

(c) to Edward Freeman passes an allotment in Lammas and Shoulder-of-Mutton Wastes covering 5a.1r.0p. (bounded on the west by Lawn Green; on part of the north by Rough Close (occupied by E. Freeman); and on the rest of the north, the east and the south by J. Bentley's enclosures);

(d) William Smart (proprietor of Hayeses Wastes) receives 17a.2r.4p. of Hayeses Wastes (in five parts: bounded on part of the west by W. Wilson's orchard; on the rest of the west by William Young's enclosure; on the north by Pickards Green; on the east by Hayeses Lane; and on the south by Exhall Hall Green);

(e) Thomas Foster (proprietor of the Gosty Wastes) takes 28a.3r.5p. in Gosty Wastes comprising "Upper Piece", "Middle Piece on the south side", "Middle Piece on the north side", "Lower Piece and "Meadow Piece" (bounded on part of the west by the Coventry-Nuneaton turnpike; on part of the north and the rest of the west by Thomas Smith's house and croft; on the rest of the north by Great Sydnal Lane leading to Great and Little Sydnal Fields; east by Little Sydnal Field; and south by Green Lane): tertiarily, Great Sydnal and Longdon Fields are awarded as follows -


(a) to Richard Cheslyn (as lay-impropriator) goes 48a.3r.24p. in Great Sydnal Field (bounded on the west by Lammas, Middle and [Farr] Wastes, and W. White's next allotment; north by the next [fourth] allotment made to R. [II] Cheslyn; east by Ann Farmer et al's next [third] allotment; and south by Little Sydnal Lane) which award is in lieu of tithes due on these two fields and on Fackley, Lammas, Middle and Far Wastes, Kings Pingle, Little and Great Down Hirons, Down Meadow and Scarlings;

(b) to R. Cheslyn also passes 8a.0r.20p. in Great Sydnal Field (bounded on the west by W. White's allotment ut infra; on the rest of the west and part of the north by M. Neale's allotment as below; on the rest of the north and on the east by allotments hereafter made to E. Catterns and A. Farmer et al; and on the south by R. Cheslyn's tithe-allotment just-described);

(c) Sir B. Garrard takes 21a.2r.0p. on Longdon Field, Longdon Meadow and Great Down Hiron (bounded on part of the west by Down Meadow Waste allotted hereafter to R. [II] Cheslyn; on part of the north by J. Bentley's allotment ut infra; on part of the east by S. [II] Brookes' and A. Hands' allotment as below; on another part of the east and the rest of the north by a portion hereinafter allotted to C. Hutchinson and C. Gunman; on the rest of the east by the Coventry-Nuneaton turnpike; on part of the south by R. [II] Cheslyn's Little Down Hiron allotment; and on the remaining parts of the west and south by Sir B. Garrard's closes);

(d) J. Bentley has 14a.0r.23p. in Longdon Field (bounded west by Down Meadow; on part of the north by Stone Piece (occupied by Samuel Saunders); on the east by the Coventry-Nuneaton turnpike; on part of the south by S. [II] Brookes' and A. Hands' allotment ut infra; and on the rest of the south by Sir B. Garrard's allotment in Longdon Field and elsewhere) which award is in compensation for Bentley's own common fields and for those formerly enjoyed by E. Freeman but bought by Bentley since the Act's passage;

(e) E. Catterns receives 15a.2r.4p. in Great Sydnal Field (bounded on part of the west by the Coventry-Nuneaton turnpike; on the north by an allotment hereinafter assigned to John Bourne, Richard Parrot and Thomas Whieldon; on the east and on part of the south by an allotment described below and destined for A. Farmer et al; and on the rest of the west and south by M. Neale's allotment ut infra);

(f) to M. Neale is assigned 12.3r.37p. in Great Sydnal Field (bounded on the west by the Coventry-Nuneaton turnpike; on the north and part of the east by E. Catterns' allotment; on the rest of the east by R. [II] Cheslyn's other Great Sydnal Field allotment; and on the rest of the south by W. White's allotment ut infra;

(g) to John Bourne, Richard Parrot and Thomas Whieldon, esq. (proprietors of nine-sixteenths of a yardland, and of the rest of John Knightley's former one-eighth yardland in Longdon and Great Sydnal Fields) is consigned 30a.0r.28p. in Great Sydnal Field (adjoining Wood Sydnal Hedge on Middle Furlong and Deacons Meadow: bounded on part of the west by the Coventry-Nuneaton turnpike; on the north and east by J. Bourne et al's enclosures; on the south-east by Little Sydnal Lane; on parts of the south and the rest of the west by A. Farmer et al's allotments ut infra; and on the rest of the west by E. Cattern's allotment);

(h) Mary Broad, widow (proprietress of 1a.3r.18p. without common in Great Sydnal Field) will accept 1a.2r.15p. in Great Sydnal Field (bounded on the west and north by A. Farmer et al's allotment detailed hereafter, and on south-east by Little Sydnal Lane);

(i) for A. Farmer et al is intended 32a.2r.10p. in Great Sydnal Field (on Great Piece Furlong shooting towards Bedworth Meadows and Crows Nest Flat: bounded on part of the west by R. [II] Cheslyn's two Great Sydnal Field allotments; on part of the north and the rest of the west by E. Catterns' allotment; on the rest of the north and part of the east by J. Bourne et al's allotment; on part of the south-east by Little Sydnal Lane; on the south and the rest of the east by M. Broad's allotment; and on the rest of the south-east by Little Sydnal Lane);

(j) for W. White is destined 4a.0r.17p. in Great Sydnal Field (bounded west by the turnpike; north by M. Neale's allotment; east by R. [II] Cheslyn's smaller Great Sydnal Field allotment; and south by Furr Waste which is allotted hereinafter to R. [II] Cheslyn);

(k) S. [II] Brookes and A. Hands will acquire 8a.0r.5p. in Longdon Field (bounded west by Sir B. Garrard's allotment; north by J. Bentley's allotment; east by the turnpike; and south by the allotment hereinafter assigned to C. Hutchinson and C. Gunman); and

(1) to C. Hutchinson and C. Gunman is given 5a.1r.30p. in Longdon Field (bounded on the west and south by Sir B. Garrard's allotment; on the north by S. [II] Brookes' and A. Hands' allotment; and east by the turnpike): quaternarily, the common closes in Great Sydnal and Longdon Fields are awarded as follows -


(a) to R. [II] Cheslyn (who takes
(i) the five pieces of land comprising 4a.3r.5p. on Fackley Waste (bounded west by the turnpike; and elsewhere by portions of Fackley Wastes in Foleshill pa.);

(ii) two parts of Fackley Waste covering 38a.2r.24p. (bounded west by the turnpike; north by Green Lane; and east and south by part of Fackley Waste in Foleshill pa.);

(iii) parts of Lammas, Middle and Farr Wastes covering 48a.3r.37p. (bounded west by the turnpike; north by W. White's Great Sydnal Field allotment; north-east and east by R. [II] Cheslyn's allotments in Great Sydnal and Longdon Fields; and south by Great Sydnal Lane which leads into Great and Little Sydnal Fields);

(iv) 4a.1r.1p. in Kings Pingle and Little Down Hiron (bounded on parts of the west and south by Pickards Green; on the rest of the west by Sir B. Garrard's enclosure; on the north by Sir B. Garrard's allotment; on the east by the turnpike; and on the rest of the south by Idle Lane); and

(v) 6a.3r.11p. in Down Meadow (bounded on the south and west by Sir B. Garrard's enclosures; on part of the north by Blind Lane; on the rest of the north by Church Meadow, Bedworth pa.; on part of the east by J. Bentley's allotment;and on the rest of the east by Sir B. Garrard's allotment) which is in lieu of R. [II] Cheslyn's common land and of that enjoyed by William Grove and Thomas Oldham in Longdon and Great Sydnal Fields, by W. Wilson in the same fields, and of R. [II] Cheslyn's land in the Scarlings allotted to W. Wilson) and (b) to W. Wilson (who receives two parts of the Scarlings covering 19a.0r.29p. (bounded west by Green Lane; north by the Ox Close and the Pingle; east by the turnpike; and south by Limekiln Waste (occupied by Revd. William Hanbury in Foleshill pa.))) - the total area is 662a.2r.8p., which with 6a.2r.37p. for roads gives a grand total of 669a.1r.5p.; the proprietors will upkeep stiles, planks, stepping-stones and all ditches at least 4ft. deep and will scour the brook where it bounds their holdings:

quintically, having recited -

firstly, that in order to give R. Cleeve 22a. the Commissioners have subtracted 9a. from all of which they could dispose in Church Field;

secondly, that J. Bourne et al have exchanged with proprietors in Church and Stone Pit Fields land worth 7/11 p.a. in Longdon and Great Sydnal Fields as their proportion of the 9a., and likewise 2/10/11 p.a.-worth for 3a. in Longdon and Great Sydnal Fields for proprietors' land in the two last-named fields (so the exchange has been allowed for in the disposition);

thirdly, that there is 6a.3r.12p. glebe;

fourthly, that proprietors have contributed the 3a.0r.28p. balance of land to give the vicar his 22a. (so the commissioners have subtracted 2a.2r.3p. from R. [II] Cheslyn's, A. Farmer et al's, W. Wilson's and E. Freeman's plots);

fifthly, that William Smart, as proprietor of Hayeses Wastes, has paid the commissioners 5/10/3 which they have transferred to the landowners in Church and Stone Pit Fields and their wastes as the purchase-price for 1a.0r.2p. in Church Field plus W. Smart's contribution to the 3a.0r.28p. (so the commissioners have subtracted 1a.0r.2p. from Church Field and added it to the Glebe);

sixthly, that Thomas Foster, as proprietor of Gosty Wastes, has similarly paid the commissioners 8/6/6 for 1a.0r.23p. in Church Field (so that area has been subtracted from Church Field and added to the glebe); and seventhly, that the wasteowners have no right of common - hence,

firstly in making such allotments, the commissioners have subtracted land worth 19/5/10 from R. [II] Cheslyn's, A. Farmer et al's, W. Wilson's and E. Freeman's allotments in satisfaction for right of common, and have received 48/14/9 and 73/4/9 from W. Smart and T. Foster for common-rights on their respective wastes;

secondly, since W. Smart has paid R. [II] Cheslyn 34/15/9 for land (worth 1/5/9 p.a.) which forms one-eighth of Hayeses Wastes and which by the Act had been appointed to R. [II] Cheslyn in lieu of impropriate tithes, the commissioners have added land of the same value to W. Smart's share when disposing of Hayeses Wastes;

thirdly, since T. Foster has paid R. [II] Cheslyn 52/6/3 for land (worth 1/18/9 p.a.) which forms one-eighth of Gosty Wastes likewise, the commissioners have similarly compensated him; and

fourthly, the proprietors of land bounded by the brook may raise mounds or fences along the opposite side of the brook for 12 yd. as watering-places (provided that they do not hinder the proprietors of the opposite bank):

sextically, from 1st. Aug., 1761 a 21/7/- p.a. modus will be deemed payable to the vicar comprizing

(a) 3/4 from C. Hutchinson and C. Gunman for a garden, orchard and two closes now occupied by Thomas Messenger;

(b) 2/- from Thomas Stephenson and -- Woodshire for their home-closes, etc.;

(c) 13/4 from A. Farmer et al for two closes (Home Close and Home Close Meadow), etc. adjoining their mansion-house, and for House Close and Broom Close (held by Ann Moore);

(d) 1/4/9 from W. Wilson (for an orchard, Moat Close, Cow Close, Hemp Yard, Ox Close, the Pingle and two closes called "the Baunyans" (let to Joseph Perkins); and for an orchard, garden and the two Staffords Closes by Hall Lane Side (tenanted by Lovel Stafford));

(e) 1/- from William Garret for an orchard, garden and home-close occupied by Moses Curtis;

(f) 3/16/2 from R. [II] Cheslyn for


(i) an orchard, garden and two home-closes, with two "Moors Closes" (farmed by Joseph Perkins);

(ii) an orchard, garden and "Doctor Handes's Close and Meadow" (let to M. Neale);

(iii) two closes called "the Betts" (occupied by E. Catterns); and

(iv) an orchard a garden, the two Hall closes, "the Grove", "the Grove Pingle", the Hall Meadow and three other closes called "the Coneygrees" (leased to T. Foster));

(g) 11/6 from William Young for an orchard, a garden, three ancient enclosures, three meadows (farmed by W. Young) and another enclosure;

(h) 14/9 from J. Bourne et al for two old grounds called "Wood Sydnals", and three closes called "the Pingles";

(i) 4/- from James Howe for lands let to Thomas Acres in Sydnal Field but not enclosed by the Act;

(j) 1/11/11 from Sir B. Garrard (for


(i) an orchard, a garden, "Clover Close", "Rushy Meadow", "the Grove", "Pit Close", "Long Close", "Calves Croft" and the two "Pratts Closes", occupied by Thomas Lole; (ii) an orchard, a garden, two "Home Closes", "Catch Croft", occupied by Mary Heathcott, widow; and (iii) an orchard, a garden, three closes and two meadows held by T. Foster);

(k) 7/- from William Howlet for an orchard, a garden, two closes and a meadow tenanted by William Ashby;

(1) 2/6 from Robert Hindes and Hannah Satchell for an orchard, a garden and a close let to William Garret;

(m) 8/4 from E. Grosvenor (for (i) two "Pingles" (leased to James Smith); and for (ii) an orchard, a garden, a home-close and three other closes farmed by Thomas Booth);

(n) 3/5 from M. Lynes for an orchard, a garden, a close and "the Pingle" farmed by Thomas Goodyer;

(o) 9/- from John Knightley, esq. (for (i) an orchard, a garden, "Home Close", "the Meadow", "Shop Close", "the Pingle", "the Green Head" and the two "Whitmores Closes" occupied by Ann Scattergood, widow; and (ii) a garden and "Poulteneys Close" occupied by W. Smart) but not levied upon J. Knightley's property at Newland in the same pa.;

(p) 8/6 from W. Smart for an orchard, a garden, "Home Close" and "Burnets Close" farmed by him;

(q) 5/- from Mary Lole, widow for an orchard, a garden and two closes occupied by herself;

(r) 1/12/6 from W. White for an orchard, a garden, "Home Meadow", "Gibbons Meadow", the two "Gibbons Closes", "Gibbons Pingle", "the Holts" (four closes), "Shepherds Nook", "Finebills" and "Fine Bills Pingle" leased to T. Stafford;

(s) 1/8/9 from E. Freeman (for (i) an orchard, a garden and a home-close occupied by Richard Jackson; (ii) an orchard, a garden, five home-closes, "the Ruff", "the Ruff Meadow", "Townsend Close" and "Heathcotts Home Close" let to Thomas Wyatt; (iii) two orchards, a garden and "the Pingle" let to Thomas Heathcott; and (iv) an orchard, a garden, "Brown Close", three other closes and two meadows leased to Mary Clark);

(t) 10/11 from S. [II] Brookes and A. Hands for an orchard, a garden, "Long Close", "the Wood", "Wood Close", "Pitt Close" and a meadow farmed by M. Neale;

(u) 1/13/4 from J. Bentley (for (i) two orchards, two gardens, "Home Close", "Thistley Close", "Long Close", "Marl Pit Close", "Broom Close", "Mill Meadow", "Home Meadow" and "Arnets Croft"; and (ii) an orchard, a garden, "Murcotts Close" and "Murcotts Pingle" (all occupied by J. Bentley));

(v) 14/- from Widow Beardsley for "Sandy Croft", "the Stirpes", "Lunts Pingle", "the Lunts", "Boggy Meadow" and "Sandy Croft Meadow" farmed by John Stafford;

(w) 3/- from the churchwardens of Holy Trinity, Coventry for a close and part of another held by William Herbutt;

(x) 2/3 from Hugh, Lord Clifford [of Chudleigh] for an orchard, a garden, a close and a meadow occupied by Edward Wells;

(y) 3/- from the Clothiers' Company, Coventry for part of one orchard and garden, and for two whole closes and one meadow, all let to E. Catterns;

(z) 4/- from the Butchers' Company, Coventry for "Butchers Close" and "the Masons Close" held by T. Messenger;


(aa) 3/- from June Butlin and Thomas Elliott for a close and part of another farmed by William Whiting;

(ab) 1/- from Michael Elliott for "Well Croft" occupied by William Goode;

(ac) 6d. from William Gulson for "the Pingle" farmed by William Bright;

(ad) 3/6 for "the Pingle" farmed by William Bright; (ad) 3/6 from [Southern & Craner's Charity] for "the Quakers Land", an orchard, a garden and three closes occupied by W. Bright;

(ae) 1/- from Joseph Jesson for an orchard, a garden and a backside occupied by Exhall overseers of the poor;

(af) 5/- from John Webster and -- Mucott for an orchard, a garden, a home-close, a meadow and "the Pingle" occupied by E. Catterns;

(ag) 1/3/2 from E. Catterns (for (i) an orchard, a garden, "Home Close", "Hill Close", "the Meadow", "Cookes Close" and "Grims Park", and (ii) another orchard and garden, "Home Close" and "Copes Close");

(ah) 1/4/7 from M. Neale for an orchard and a garden, "the Croft", "Birchmoores Meadow", "the Birchmoores" (three closes) and two closes called "the Tomlins";

(ai) 1/8 from J. Knightley, esq. for his Newland properties; and

(aj) 5/- from John Brid, esq. and Catherine Shuckburgh, widow for their Newland premises) which (modus) will be paid half-yearly at Candlemas and Lammas from 2nd. Feb., 1762 and, with the 22a., is compensation for glebe and tithe, but R. [II] Cheslyn keeps his rights as lay-impropriator to receive mortuaries, Easter-offerings or surplice-fees: septemically, since the Act says that any roads through the new allotments should be 30ft. broad between ditches and repaired at the parish's expense - hence, firstly, the commissioners appoint private ways


(a) a 30ft. one from the churchyard gates through the parish officers' allotment and W. White's in Church Field up to Vicarage Lane;

(b) a 30ft. one from the churchyard gates through R. Cleeve's allotment and R. [II] Cheslyn's in Church Field to Exhall Hall Lane;

(c) a 20ft. one from the churchyard through R. [II] Cheslyn's Church Field allotment, and S. [II] Brookes' and A. Hands' land in Stone Pit Field to Dead Lane;

(d) a 20ft. one from E. Catterns' Stone Pit Field allotment through C. Hutchinson's and C. Gunman's to Woodshires Green; and (e) a 10ft. one leaving (b) by the churchyard in R. [II] Cheslyn's secondly-described Church Field allotment and going to M. Barrs' land) for the use of the parishioners, although the proprietors may draw a load of lime along the ways for each load of coal drawn out to other parishes; secondly, a private bridle way is delimited, 10ft. wide, which leaves private road

(e) in M. Barrs' allotment and passes through R. [II] Cheslyn's secondly-described Church Field allotment to the Ford Gate, thence through the rest of R. [II] Cheslyn's land there, into W. Wilson's Stone Pit Field allotment to the south-western corner of "Cow Close", through W. Wilson's allotment (skirting the close) to the gate at the north-western corner of "Hemp Yard Piece" which gives out onto a lane leading to the Moathouse( it will not be used for coal-carting); thirdly, the commissioners describe common footways (viz.)

(a) one going from the churchyard gates by the northern side of the firstly-described private way to Vicarage Lane;

(b) one from the churchyard gates through R. Cleeve's allotment, R. [II] Cheslyn's firstly-described Church Field allotment and Sir B. Garrard's allotment, by the eastern side of Catch Croft, to Catch Croft Lane;

(c) one from the north-eastern corner of the churchyard via R. [II] Cheslyn's secondly-described Church Field allotment to a gate which gives on to Exhall Hall Yard;

(d) one from the churchyard's north-eastern corner-gate through R. [II] Cheslyn's secondly-described allotment to a stile which gives access to Exhall Hall Meadow;

(e) one from the churchyard's south-eastern corner-gate through R. [II] Cheslyn's secondly-described Church Field allotment, across Stonebridge and along the hereinbefore-delineated bridleway to a stile at the north-western corner of Hemp Yard;

(f) one from Vicarage Lane gate through W. White's Churchfield allotment, and S. [II] Brookes' and A. Hands' Stone Pit Field one, into M. Neale's Stone Pit Field allotment, thencealongside J. Bentley's one (by the hedge which divides it from Lower Holt, Upper Holt, Little Holt and Murcotts Close) to a stile which gives access to Cookes Close;

(g) one from a stile in Woodshires Close, through the southern side of C. Hutchinson's and C. Gunman's Stone Pit Field allotment to a footbridge and stile leading into Mill Meadow (which is occupied by E. Catterns);

(h) one from a stile at Pickards Home Close, through A. Farmer et al's and W. Wilson's Stone Pit Field allotments, over Cross Furlong, and through R. [II] Cheslyn's secondly-described Stone Pit Field allotment to a stile giving access to Exhall Hall Close;

(i) one from "Stone Bridge" through R. Cheslyn's secondly-described Stone Pit Field allotment, and S. [II] Brookes' and A. Hands' one there, to a stile which leads to Little Holt;

(j) one from Exhall Hall Yard gate via both of R. [II] Cheslyn's Church Field allotments and Sir B. Garrard's one there (on the western side of Exhall Hall Green) to a stile which gives access to Bedworth Heath;

(k) one from Catch Croft Lane through Sir B. Garrard's Stone Pit Field allotment, then via the lane, Bedworth Heath and Jackson's Orchard to the (j)-mentioned stile;

(l) one from Gibbons Stile, through E. Grosevenor's firstly-described allotment, then via R. [II] Cheslyn's firstly-described Church Field allotment (by the uppermost Birding-bush) and so to the gate giving on to Exhall Hall Yard;

(m) one from (l) at the Birdingbush, through R. [II] Cheslyn's firstly-described Church Field allotment to footway (b);

(n) one from a stile in "the Gibbons" via E. Grosvenor's firstly-described allotment, over "Grosvenors Piece" furlong to the stile which affords access to Grosvenors Pingle; and

(o) a 10-ft. wide footpath which leaves the eastern side of the Coventry-Nuneaton turnpike at the south-western corner of R. [II] Cheslyn's firstly-described allotment on Fackley Waste, thence to that allotment's north-western corner where it joins R. [II] Cheslyn's secondly-described Fackley Waste allotment's south-western corner, thence to that allotment's north-western corner where it adjoins Thomas Foster's Gosty Waste allotment, then to the west of R. [II] Cheslyn's thirdly-described wastes-allotments (on Lammas, Middle and Farr Wastes), along W. White's Great Sydnal Field allotment's western side, to the west of M. Neale's and E. Cattern's Great Sydnal Field allotments, so rejoining the turnpike); and

fourthly, the commissioners bespeak a 12-ft. wide cart-bridge, with a 6-ft. arch, for carrying the (a)-mentioned private way: octically, since the Act extinguishes leases in to-be-enclosed lands - hence, the commissioners order that the proprietors give satisfaction to lessees because of

(a) a lease by R. [II] Cheslyn's father Richard [I] to Joseph Perkins (yeoman) for 21 years from Lady Day, 1746, for which R. [II] Cheslyn should pay J. Perkins 1/-; and

(b) a lease by Samuel [I] Brookes (father of S. [II] Brookes and A. Hands) to William Smart's father John for a like term from 1749 for which they should pay W. Smart 15: and nonically, since, firstly, the Act says that the proprietors (except the vicar) should bear enclosure-award charges proportionately;

secondly, that certain sums are owed 196/10/10 to Osborne Barnwell for soliciting; 61/10/10 to J. Corbett for surveying; 61/10/8 to John Newcombe jun. (gent.) for attending the commissioners; 70/7/7 to the commissioners themselves; 15/15/- and 23/13/5 to respectively M. Barrs and Samuel Thomas (of Coventry, innholder); 26/18/4 to Thomas Lynes and M. Neale for making mounds on R. Cleeve's 22a.; 17/1/4 to Thomas Kington for attending on the proprietors; 7/2/- to M. Neale for building the bridge across the brook to carry the firstly-described private way through R. Cleeve's allotment; and 7/18/-, 12/10/10 and 4/0/1 to M. Neale, T. Foster and J. Bentley respectively for their work towards the enclosure); and

thirdly, that with 17/0/8 sundries the exercise cost 521/15/2 - hence that sum will be paid (as follows:- 200/16/5 to R. [II] Cheslyn, 34/4/5 to Sir B. Garrard, 7/0/9 to E. Freeman, 15/19/0 to E. Grosvenor, 3/18/9 to M. Lynes, 11/9 to M. Barrs, 3/4/11 to Exhall parish officers, 6/8/1 to W. White, 16/11/7 to S. [II] Brookes and A. Hands, 24/13/11 to M. Neale, 3/8/6 to J. Bentley, 11/14/4 to C. Hutchinson and C. Gunman, 58/8/3 to A. Farmer et al, 43/17/11 to W. Wilson, 13/11/3 to W. Smart, 20/9/8 to T. Foster, 15/5/11 to J. Bourne et al, and 15/3 to M. Broad) to J. Newcombe jun. and Lewis Bradley before 18th. Mar. [, 1763]. Signed at S. Thomas' inn, the "White Bear".

10th. Aug., 1763. Acknowledgement of the deed in Chancery.


Reference: PA 242/6/1 - Creation dates: 22nd Mar, 1777

Scope and Content Feoffment, for 6/6/-, by Samuel Dodd (of Foleshill, Coventry, worstead-weaver) of Mary [I] Smith (of Coventry, widow) with a piece of land (23p.) in Foleshill pa. Which before the [1775] enclosure was called Little Heath, occupied by Samuel Dodd and allotted to him by the award (which numbered it 94) in lieu of common.
Livery of seisin endorsed.


Reference: PA/101/12/66 - Draft Will Creation dates: 1839

Scope and Content Of Thomas Rushen (of Foleshill, Coventry, weaver) who bequeaths five houses near the "Royal Oak" in Foleshill pa.

Beside the Coventry-Stoney Stanton turnpike (occupied by John Knight, John Barnes, John Parsons, Widow [Par]sons and William Birch) and a house at Little Heath, Foleshill (let to William Orton) with a brewhouse etc.

Nearby (inhabited by the testator and Job Lomax) to his son George for life and then to his issue with right of survivorship; seven Little Heath houses (tenanted by Job Lomax, John Iliffe, Joseph Meadows, the testator, his son Joseph, William Spencer and the testator's son George) will pass to his son Joseph with like remainder;


To his son George the testator bequeaths absolutely a Garden at Crab Mill Lane, Foleshill pa.
Adjoining the five houses (cultivated by Henry Rushen and John Knight) and two messuages at Little Heath (occupied by Stephen Thrasher and Mary Stretton) with a 2r.18p. Meadow (used by Samuel North as a garden), subject to half of any mortgages owed by the testator;


To his son Joseph the testator gives 2r.21p. consisting of a house and meadow at Little Heath (tenanted by Charles Thrasher); The two sons will share household goods equally; Joseph Bacon (of Foleshill, carpenter) and Joseph Atkins (of Foleshill, weaver) are appointed executors.


Catalogue Ref. PA 362 Creator(S): Irby Hopkins of Coventry, solicitors

FILE - Letter from Webster to Thynne reporting that Pinsents have warned that Cruwys & Holborough will issue a writ unless the balance of their account be paid - Pinsent and the sender will ask the bank the next day for a 3,000 overdraft on 3,000 first-mortgage railway-company debentures (he has shown the bank-manager the works). Lomas cannot complete his Webster St. Purchase but it could be transferred to Lole. He reiterates his wishes about Station St. West land as shown on an endorsed sketch. - ref. PA 362/22/90 - date: 17th July, 1901

FILE - Letter from same to same enclosing an agreement for sale of 400 sq. Yd. At Station St. West for 5/- per sq. Yd. He also sends Lomas' contract (whose plot Lole of Longford will take at 5/6 as asked) - they should settle on 28th. Sept.. - ref. PA 362/37/5 - date: 2nd Aug, 1901

FILE - Letter from Whites to Thynnes asking why Irby's sale to James Lomas has not been expedited; they want to know the land's terrier-number. - ref. PA 362/39/1 - date: 11th Jan, 1901

FILE - Letter from James Lomas (builder, of Little Heath, Foleshill) to Thynnes requesting to be freed from the Webster St. Land so that Webster may sell it as the sender cannot build on it. - ref. PA 362/39/2 - date: 20th July, 1901

FILE - Letter from Whites to Thynnes retailing Orton's contention that the land formerly earmarked for Lomas was only 37 ft. 9 in. Wide at the back although 39 ft. At the front; they send draft agreements but need a correct plan. Plan attached. - ref. PA 362/39/5 - date: 14th Nov, 1901

FILE - Letter from Webster to Thynnes covering a receipt for 55 from Lomas. - ref. PA 362/39/6 - date: 26th Nov, 1901


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